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Tag: oral surgery

dental surgery burnaby
FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions About Oral Surgery

1. Who will need an oral surgery?

Oral surgical procedures involve the incision, excision, or reflection of tissue that exposes the normally sterile areas of the oral cavity. Examples are biopsy, periodontal surgery, apical surgery, implant surgery, and surgical extractions of teeth (removal of erupted or nonerupted tooth requiring elevation of the mucoperiosteal flap, removal of bone or section of tooth, and suturing if needed).

2. Who will need periodontal surgery?

Periodontal or “gum” surgery is needed when conservative non-surgical treatments are ineffective in completely eradicating the periodontal disease. Luckily, periodontal surgery is a very simple and extremely effective technique to treat advanced periodontal problems.

3. What is apical surgery?

Apical surgery is considered a standard oral surgical procedure. It is often the last resort to surgically maintain a tooth with a periapical lesion that cannot be managed with conventional endodontic (re-)treatment. The main goal of apical surgery is to prevent bacterial leakage from the root-canal system into the periradicular tissues by placing a tight root-end filling following root-end resection. A major step in apical surgery is to identify possible leakage areas at the cut root face and subsequently to ensure adequate root-end filling. Only a tight and persistent apical obturation will allow periapical healing with good long-term prognosis.

4. When do I need a surgical extraction of teeth?

If a more volatile tooth has yet to grow in, however, your dentist needs to remove gum tissue or bone in order to extract it. This is called a surgical extraction and requires stitches to close the site so that it can heal properly.  If a tooth breaks off during the procedure, for instance, it may need to be taken out in pieces. Wisdom teeth often face surgical extraction because they are usually impacted, meaning they are not completely erupted into the mouth. This condition requires cutting through bone and tissue. Removing severely broken down teeth, root tips or teeth with long-curved roots are other examples of surgical extractions. Then there are times when the bone around a tooth has become dense, resulting in the need for surgical treatment.

5. What will happen during my procedure?

Your oral surgeon/dentist will explain how they plan to perform your surgery. Without having to get into too many specifics, you will know where your incision is being made, and any other details about what the procedure entails and what the goal is.

6. Do I need to be sedated during my oral surgery instead of the local anesthesia?

A dentist will request in-depth past medical history before a patient can be sedated. Not all patients are able to be sedated. Patients who are anxious, nervous, or scared of dental visits may request sedation for a variety of dental care from a regular cleaning to wisdom teeth extractions. However, there may be other techniques to help a patient receive the necessary dental treatment in a safe and comfortable manner.

7. How long will the procedure take?

It depends on which oral surgery that your dentist consulted you to take. It could be from one hour to four hours or more. Ask your dentist for more details to suit your schedule.

8. How long is the recovery?

It depends on the kind of oral surgery. Wisdom teeth extraction usually takes a few days to one week for the pain and swelling to subside. The gums can take up to a month to completely heal. Your dentist will recommend a soft diet for a few days and provide detailed recovery instructions, such as how to deal with discomfort and swelling. Dental implants also require some healing time and this varies from patient to patient and procedure to procedure.

9. What food should I eat and avoid after surgery?

For 2 days after surgery, drink liquids and eat soft foods only. Such as milkshakes, eggnog, yogurt, cooked cereals, cottage cheese, smooth soups, mashed potatoes, refried beans, ice cream, pudding, fruit smoothies and protein shakes. On day 3 after surgery, eat soft foods that do not require much chewing, such as macaroni and cheese, cooked noodles, soft-boiled /scrambled/ poached eggs and soft sandwiches. Avoid tough or crunchy foods, such as pizza, rice, popcorn, and hamburger. Avoid spicy and acidic foods. Most patients may resume their normal diet 7 days after surgery.

10. What should not you do after oral surgery?

  • Do not apply heat to your face, unless your surgeon told you to do so.
  • Heat can increase swelling.
  • Do not use straws, suck on anything, or smoke.
  • These actions cause negative pressure in your mouth, which can dislodge the blood clot that is keeping your wound closed, causing more bleeding, and delay your healing.
  • Do not blow your nose. Wipe instead.  If you need to sneeze, do so with your mouth open.
burnaby oral surgery
Family Dentistry

Oral Surgery

burnaby-oral-surgery

Any procedure that involves cutting into or removing tissue from your mouth, tooth extraction, or installing a dental implant is considered oral surgery. This type of surgery is used to treat many problems in the areas of the face, jaw, neck, and the hard and soft tissues of the mouth.

Usually, our Coquitlam Dentist will remove a tooth if it appears to be broken, infected, loose, or impacted. After taking a dental x-ray and examining the problem area, our Dentist in Coquitlam will decide which type of extraction is needed. Of course, other options are available if tooth removal is unwanted.

Reasons for Extractions

  1. Trauma to the mouth
  2. Badly damaged tooth or teeth
  3. Crowded mouth
  4. Caved or infected tooth or teeth

Frequently Asked Questions About Oral Surgery

burnaby dental oral surgery

1. Who will need an oral surgery?

Oral surgical procedures involve the incision, excision, or reflection of tissue that exposes the normally sterile areas of the oral cavity. Examples are biopsy, periodontal surgery, apical surgery, dental implant surgery, and surgical extractions of teeth (removal of erupted or nonerupted tooth requiring elevation of the mucoperiosteal flap, removal of bone or section of tooth, and suturing if needed).

2. Who will need periodontal surgery?

Periodontal or “gum” surgery is needed when conservative non-surgical treatments are ineffective in completely eradicating the periodontal disease. Luckily, periodontal surgery is a very simple and extremely effective technique to treat advanced periodontal problems.

3. What is apical surgery?

Apical surgery is considered a standard oral surgical procedure. It is often the last resort to surgically maintain a tooth with a periapical lesion that cannot be managed with conventional endodontic (re-)treatment. The main goal of apical surgery is to prevent bacterial leakage from the root-canal system into the periradicular tissues by placing a tight root-end filling following root-end resection. A major step in apical surgery is to identify possible leakage areas at the cut root face and subsequently to ensure adequate root-end filling. Only a tight and persistent apical obturation will allow periapical healing with good long-term prognosis.

4. When do I need a surgical extraction of teeth?

If a more volatile tooth has yet to grow in, however, our Ridgeway Dentist needs to remove gum tissue or bone in order to extract it. This is called a surgical extraction and requires stitches to close the site so that it can heal properly.  If a tooth breaks off during the procedure, for instance, it may need to be taken out in pieces. Wisdom teeth often face surgical extraction because they are usually impacted, meaning they are not completely erupted into the mouth. This condition requires cutting through bone and tissue. Removing severely broken down teeth, root tips or teeth with long-curved roots are other examples of surgical extractions. Then there are times when the bone around a tooth has become dense, resulting in the need for surgical treatment.

5. What will happen during my procedure?

Our Coquitlam Dentist will explain how they plan to perform your surgery. Without having to get into too many specifics, you will know where your incision is being made, and any other details about what the procedure entails and what the goal is.

6. Do I need to be sedated during my oral surgery instead of the local anesthesia?

Our Dentist in Coquitlam will request in-depth past medical history before a patient can be sedated. Not all patients are able to be sedated. Patients who are anxious, nervous, or scared of dental visits may request sedation for a variety of dental care from a regular cleaning to wisdom teeth extractions. However, there may be other techniques to help a patient receive the necessary dental treatment in a safe and comfortable manner.

7. How long will the procedure take?

It depends on which oral surgery that our dentist consulted you to take. It could be from one hour to four hours or more. Ask our Dentist on Ridgeway Dental for more details to suit your schedule.

8. How long is the recovery?

It depends on the kind of oral surgery. Wisdom teeth extraction usually takes a few days to one week for the pain and swelling to subside. The gums can take up to a month to completely heal. Our Coquitlam Dentist will recommend a soft diet for a few days and provide detailed recovery instructions, such as how to deal with discomfort and swelling. Dental implants also require some healing time and this varies from patient to patient and procedure to procedure.

9. What food should I eat and avoid after surgery?

For 2 days after surgery, drink liquids and eat soft foods only. Such as milkshakes, eggnog, yogurt, cooked cereals, cottage cheese, smooth soups, mashed potatoes, refried beans, ice cream, pudding, fruit smoothies and protein shakes. On day 3 after surgery, eat soft foods that do not require much chewing, such as macaroni and cheese, cooked noodles, soft-boiled /scrambled/ poached eggs and soft sandwiches. Avoid tough or crunchy foods, such as pizza, rice, popcorn, and hamburger. Avoid spicy and acidic foods. Most patients may resume their normal diet 7 days after surgery.

10. What should not you do after oral surgery?

  • Do not apply heat to your face, unless your surgeon told you to do so.
  • Heat can increase swelling.
  • Do not use straws, suck on anything, or smoke.
  • These actions cause negative pressure in your mouth, which can dislodge the blood clot that is keeping your wound closed, causing more bleeding, and delay your healing.
  • Do not blow your nose. Wipe instead.  If you need to sneeze, do so with your mouth open.
root canal in burnaby
Family Dentistry

Root Canal

burnaby dental root canal

When the nerve of a tooth is affected by decay or an infection, a root canal procedure is necessary. But don’t worry, our Coquitlam Dentists have successfully completed hundreds of root canals over the years. In order to ensure tooth survival, the living tissue inside the tooth known as the pulp will have to be removed along with the nerves, bacteria, and overall decay. The empty space is then filled with medicated dental materials, specially designed to restore the tooth to full functionality.

Having a root canal performed is the best treatment for saving an infected tooth that would otherwise wither away and die on its own. Many patients believe that removing a tooth is the only way to fix a problem. Not only is this untrue, but removing a tooth can end up being more expensive than other procedures because the infection might spread to adjacent teeth. Root canals are very successful and in most cases, last a lifetime. If there are any new infections that form, the tooth can easily retreat.

Reasons for a Root Canal

  1. Swelling or tenderness
  2. Heat and cold sensitivity
  3. Severe toothache (worse with pressure)
  4. Presence of an abscess (round bump) on the gums

Frequently Asked Questions About Root Canal

1. What is a Root Infection and How Do I Know If I Have One?

When the bottom section (below the gum) of a tooth develops a cavity, either through decay or a fracture, this gap quickly fills up with nasty bacteria. This is very bad for the health of teeth and gums and puts a great strain on surrounding tissues. If left untreated, it can cause tooth loss, bone degeneration, and gum disease.

The symptoms of a root infection can sometimes be very easy to spot and a little trickier at other times. In fact, you really do not want the symptoms to be too obvious because if they are, you likely have an abscess. This is a very painful condition and it only occurs if a dental problem has been allowed to deteriorate.

In some cases, root infections may present mild pain, but to make sure that they are spotted early, keep up with regular dentist appointments. That way, a root canal can be scheduled before any irreversible damage is done to the pulp inside the affected tooth. This will give you a very high chance of being able to keep it. On the other hand, if the infection has been allowed to fester for too long, the tooth may need to be extracted.

2. Is it expensive?

Saving your tooth through endodontic treatment is less expensive and less invasive than an extraction and replacement with a bridge or implant. The cost will depend on your dental insurance coverage. Our dental professionals will help with getting your insurance information and let you know the cost of your root canal.

3. How long does the repaired tooth last?

Potentially, the repaired tooth lasts a lifetime! If the patient has a good oral care routine and visits the dentist twice a year for cleanings and exams, the restored tooth should have a long life.

4. What is a root canal procedure?

During root canal treatment, the tooth pulp and tooth roots are cleaned to remove microbes that cause infection, and a filling material is placed in the roots.

The procedure is performed when the tooth pulp has become infected (a condition is known as pulpitis) or when the infection has spread to the roots or jawbone.

Microbes and infected tissue are removed from the pulp and roots using special needles and chemical rinsing substances. After the tooth has been disinfected, a filling material is placed in the root canal.

5. What problems and pain can occur due to the root canal procedure?

Root canal treatment usually requires multiple relatively long visits (30-90 minutes per visit). The mouth has to be kept open during the treatment, and as a result, jaw joints and the muscles that keep the mouth open often get tired.

Local anesthesia used in dental procedures is effective in preventing root canal pain during the treatment. It may not work properly in rare cases, such as when the infection has spread widely and caused changes in the acidity of the surrounding tissue.

Sometimes, teeth become discolored and turn dark or grey following a root canal treatment. This discoloration is caused by bleeding inside the tooth or by the filling material used in the procedure. Discolored teeth can be whitened.

6. What can I do if root canal therapy doesn’t work?

At times, a root canal won’t be able to save your tooth. One of the best alternatives to root canal therapy is a tooth extraction. If your dentist recommends this dental procedure, you will also need a tooth implant or dental bridge in order to restore full functionality of your mouth and smile.

7. Should I be worried about X-rays?

No. While x-rays will be necessary during your endodontic treatment, we use an advanced non-film computerized system called digital radiography that produces radiation levels up to 90 percent lower than those of already low dose conventional dental x-ray machinery.

8. Is there any other method to reduce my anxiety besides local anesthesia?

We are very sensitive to the fact that, no matter how well-informed you are about the procedure, you may still experience anxiety. Protecting your oral health is our top priority, and we don’t want you to forgo treatment because you’re fearful about the procedure. In that case we offer sedation options that will calm you so that you can get the treatment you need.

9. How will I feel after a root canal?

Your tooth may feel a little sensitive after the procedure, but you’ll finally be out of pain! If you’re experiencing soreness or sensitivity, you can take over-the-counter medications.

10. Will the tooth need any special care or additional treatment?

After your root canal procedure, you should be careful not to bite or chew on the treated tooth until it has recovered. We encourage all patients to practice good daily oral care that includes flossing and brushing.